White-Tie Affair

White-Tie Affair

Justin Lavenue, the co-owner of The Roosevelt Room in Austin, will vouch for white port’s deliciousness on its own. “But it’s great when used as a substitute for other fortified or aromatized wines,” he says. Case in point: this floral, aromatic, low-ABV sipper.

In his take on a classic Chrysanthemum, the recipe for which was first published in Harry Craddock’s The Savoy Cocktail Book in 1930, Lavenue adds a hefty pour of white port to the white-vermouth-and-Benedictine formula, dressing it up even further with a chamomile infusion and a bit of verjus blanc.

He keeps the Chrysanthemum’s bit of absinthe, but calls for sweeter blanc vermouth instead of the typical dry, and adds a few drops of a salt tincture to accentuate all of the cocktail’s complex notes.

It adds up to a pleasing plethora of floral notes, fitting for a riff on a classic cocktail named for a flower.

Check out 11 Essential Cocktails for Your July Parties 

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Taylor Fladgate Chip dry white port 
  • 1 ounce chamomile-infused blanc vermouth*
  • 1/4 ounce Benedictine
  • 1 teaspoon verjus blanc
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kubler absinthe
  • 4 drops salt tincture**
  • Garnish: lemon twist
  • Garnish: baby’s breath (optional)

 

Steps

  1. Add all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice and stir until well-chilled.

  2. Strain into a chilled Nick & Nora glass.

  3. Express the oils from a lemon twist over the drink, then discard the twist.

  4. Garnish with baby’s breath on the side of the glass, if desired. Note: Do not let the baby’s breath, if used, come in contact with the cocktail. It is mildly toxic and may cause stomach upset if ingested.

*Chamomile-infused blanc vermouth: Add 20 grams of dried chamomile flowers into a 750-mL bottle of blanc vermouth. Allow to infuse overnight. Strain through a coffee filter or cheesecloth, discarding the solids, and bottle. Will keep, tightly sealed and refrigerated, for about two weeks.

**Salt tincture: In a small blender (or Vitamix, Nutribullet, or similar), add 1 part extra-fine-grain Himalayan salt and 5 parts distilled water and pulse to combine. Add 5 parts vodka, then pulse again. Pour into a dropper bottle for use.

Related Post Salt in Your Cocktails? The Why and How

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