Ancient Winery Discovered in Israel Is ‘Largest Crusader-Era Winery Yet’

Ancient Winery Discovered in Israel Is ‘Largest Crusader-Era Winery Yet’

Centuries may go by, but discovering ancient wineries never gets old. Excavations in a small western Galilean village in Israel recently revealed what local archaeologists are calling “the largest Crusader-era winery yet found” in the region, the Drinks Business reported on Tuesday.

In Mi’ilya, Israel, archaeologists have been working to excavate and restore a mid-12th century castle believed to have been built by King Baldwin III (the king of Jerusalem from 1143 to 1163). The winery was found under the home of a local gas station owner, Salma Assaf.

Galilee, which is a vineyard region today, was reportedly planted with vines during the Roman and Crusader periods. As such, the ancient winery and castle would have likely been the center of a fief, where local grape growers from neighboring villages would be required to bring their crops as rent or dues.

As for the gas station owner, Assaf has reportedly moved to a new home, and built a restaurant in his former residence. There, patrons can view the ancient winery through glass floors, as well as visit the winery below.

The article Ancient Winery Discovered in Israel Is ‘Largest Crusader-Era Winery Yet’ appeared first on VinePair.

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